Inconsiderate pavement parking is much more than inconvenience at the school gates

I have to congratulate the Express & Echo for highlighting the issue of inconsiderate pavement park, as it’s a problem that I’ve been raising for many years.

However, it seems that when Cllr Peter Holland and Cllr Percy Prowse spoke to Transport Minister, Chris Grayling, last week, their concerns were limited to pavement parking outside schools – It’s up to council to solve dangerous school gate parking, says transport minister [E&E On-line, 22 October 2016].

 

For me this issue is much more than this – as it inconveniences parents with buggies, people with disabilities, and those with visual impairments to make but a few.

As an example of this anti-social behaviour I draw attention to 2 examples I’ve witnessed in Newman Road over the past couple of weeks.

In the first example, the car is parked completely on the pavement, meaning there is no way through for any pedestrian, let alone for anyone with a disability or with a pushchair.

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In the following 2 examples, partial parking on the pavement still blocks the footpath, inconveniencing vulnerable people.

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However, over the same period, Barley Farm Road – where I more often than not observe pavement parking – has been somewhat free of this.

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Indeed, there seems to be only one vehicle transgressing!

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Driving on (including onto) a pavement is illegal and you can be fined up to £1,000 if witnessed by the police.

The police can issue parking tickets for driving on a pavement, parking across a drop kerb or causing wilful obstruction.

Devon County Council’s Civil Enforcement Officers  can issue parking tickets for parking on double yellow lines or other parking restrictions. They can also issue Advisory Notices for any kind of pavement parking.

So, please on’t park on a pavement.

Reporting pavement parking

Devon County Council want more information about pavement parking in Devon.

They intend to use this to get a clear picture of the issue and to help plan solutions, such as changing the routes of traffic wardens to cover problem areas, or deciding whether the road needs double yellow lines. This data is for long-term planning.

They can’t respond to any immediate issues and they  can’t help in an emergency. If pavement parking is causing a wilful obstruction or there is danger phone the Police on 101.

Use this form to report regular pavement parking. Or call Devon Highways on 0845 155 1004 or 0345 155 1004.

E&E Letters | Inconsiderate pavement parking – Let’s make it ‘cross-party’

E&E

13 October 2016

Inconsiderate pavement parking – Let’s make it ‘cross-party’

I welcome the recent thoughts of Cllr Peter Holland on the issue of inconsiderate pavement parking [Anger over inconsiderate pavement parking in ExeterE&E, 10 October 2016] as they echo the same comments I’ve been making for the past five years.

Cllr Holland is correct that section 30 of the Exeter City Council Act 1987 did outlaw the practice of parking on footpaths [ie pavements] and verges, and this provision was enforced by traffic wardens under the direction of Devon & Cornwall Police.

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However, Cllr Holland is mistaken in saying “when the responsibility for enforcement of the law was transferred to Devon County Council the law went into ‘decay’.”

The truth is that when parking enforcement was decriminalised in May 2008, those powers transferred to Devon County Council and now Civil Enforcement Officers [CEOs] enforce using powers issued by the Secretary of State for Transport [The Rt Hon Chris Grayling MP] under regulations contained within the Traffic Management Act 2004.

And in the rush to transfer powers to DCC, the provisions of the Exeter Act 1987 were missed.

A new power was conveyed by Statutory Instrument 2012 No.12 issued by the Government under the TMA 2004. Within its Schedules, the Statutory Instrument details which restrictions can be enforced by DCC’s CEOs.

statutory-instrument-2012-no-12Civil enforcement of offences in section 30 of the Exeter City Council Act 1987
2. In Schedule 7 to the Traffic Management Act 2004 (road traffic contraventions subject to civilenforcement), in paragraph 4 (parking contraventions outside Greater London), after subparagraph
(2)(e) insert—
“(ea) an offence under section 30(1) of the Exeter City Council Act 1987 (c. xi)(prohibition of parking vehicles on verges, central reservations and footways).”(b)

However, the situation was complicated in that the Department for Transport informed DCC – as the Local Highways Authority – that it would require additional signage, at intervals of around 400m, to enforce the new legislation.

And, of course, there are some roads which would be blocked without pavement parking,

Indeed the P bus – which coincidently serves both my ward of St Thomas and that of Cllr Holland – would be unable to make its way down Barley Farm Road if all the vehicles parked on the road.

If the situation is complicated in Exeter, then it is even more complex nationally.

The only mention of pavement parking in the Highway Code is under Rule 244:
“You MUST NOT park partially or wholly on the pavement in London, and should not do so elsewhere unless signs permit it. Parking on the pavement can obstruct and seriously inconvenience pedestrians, people in wheelchairs or with visual impairments and people with prams or pushchairs.”

The direction MUST NOT is legally enforceable [under the Greater London Council (General Powers) Act 1974 section 15] but should not is an advisory direction, not an enforceable one.

There is little or nothing DCC’s Civil Enforcement Officers can do in this situation – unless the vehicle is causing damage to the pavement, when the driver *could* be prosecuted. In practice, this rarely happen, if at all.

Interestingly [as it pre-dates motorised vehicles], under section 72 of the Highways Act 1837 it is an offence to wilfully [but note, not park] “a carriage of any description upon the footpath.” But this can only be enforced by a warrant Police Officer, who needs to see the carriage actually driving on the footpath – even though to park on the pavement, the vehicle must have been driven onto it.

And it is also an offence under the Highways Act 1980 and also under s.28 of the Town and Police Clauses Act 1847 to “wilfully obstruct free passage along the highway or deposit anything which causes an interruption to, or obstruction of, the highway [including any public footpath or public thoroughfare].

In these cases, enforcement is the responsibility of warranted Police Officers and authorised PCSOs, rather than DCC’s CEOs.

At a meeting of the joint Exeter City Council and Devon CC’s joint Exeter Highways and Traffic Orders Committee [HATOC] held on 28 July 2015 [see minute 119], County Officers expressed confidence that a Private Members’ Bill  being brought forward by Simon Hoare MP [CON, North Devon], which would resolve the whole issue of inconsiderate pavement parking.

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I wasn’t convinced at the meeting that the Bill would proceed, and so it came to pass that on 08 December 2015, after a debate in the House of Commons, Simon Hoare withdrew his Pavement Parking (Protection of Vulnerable Pedestrians) Bill 2015-16 because he had been promised that “DfT would undertake some work to examine more closely the legal and financial implication of an alternative regime.”

So Cllr Holland’s own Government appears to kicked the issue into the long grass.

I note he hopes to raise the issue when the Minister, the Rt Hon Chris Grayling MP, visits the city later this month.

Let me make this offer – we could make this a cross-party issue and I would be happy to meet the Minister along with him.

Paul Bull
Labour & Co-operative Councillor, St Thomas Ward