Pavement parking | Some thoughts for today’s Exeter HATOC

Later today, Exeter Highways and Traffic Orders Committee [HATOC] meet at County Hall

One of the items on the agenda is an update on Parking on Pavements.

it will be interesting to hear what will be said because, despite what’s been said and written n recent weeks, to is not necessary an offence to park on a pavement

Some thoughts for the meeting

1) The current legal position
Under s.137 of Highways Act 1980 it is the duty of the highway authority to assert and protect the rights of the public to use and enjoy the highway (the term highway in this instance includes footways = pavements).

It is a criminal offence under HA 1980 and also under s.28 of Town & Police Clauses Act 1847 to wilfully obstruct free passage along the highway or to deposit anything which causes an interruption to, or obstruction of, the highway (including any public footpath or public thoroughfare).

Under s.72 of Highways Act 1837 it is an offence to wilfully drive ant carriage of any description upon the footpath.

And regulation 103 of the Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) Regulations 1985 states that no person in charge of a motor vehicle…shall cause or permit the vehicle to stand on the road  so as to cause unnecessary obstruction of the road. This included vehicles parked on footpaths and contravention of this regulation is a criminal offence and the police can require removal of the vehicle.

Of course, Highway Code rule 244 is clear of the situation in London using MUST NOT, but for the rest of the country the rule is the less forceful SHOULD NOT.

The above begs the question – who is responsible for enforcement in each case? Police (and do PCSOs have any powers in such cases)? Or Civil Enforcement Officers?

And of course, what time and priority should be given to enforcement? To use a phrase I often hear in relation to speeding in 20 mph zones – there must be a  responsible and proportionate approach to enforcement

2) Decriminalised Parking Enforcement
The Road Traffic Act 1991 (c. 40) provided for the decriminalisation of parking-related contraventions, with enforcement
carried out by civil enforcement officers, operating on behalf of a local authority

However some parking offences can still be enforced by the police, as outlined by this report on Civil Parking Enforcement: New Responsibilities that was considered by Devon County Council’s Executive on 17 October 2006

On the 5 May 2008, responsibility for on-street parking enforcement in Devon passed from the police to local authorities and traditional traffic wardens were replaced by new Civil Enforcement Officers

But at this time the Exeter Act 1987 was not repealed and so I believe that parking on the verge or footway of an urban road is still a CRIMINAL offence enforceable by a police officer.

3) Traffic Management Act 2004 (Amendment of Schedule 7) (City of Exeter) Regulations 
Even after all my previous research and the numerous discussions held at Exeter HATOC, I have just come across a Staututory Instrument, the Traffic Management Act 2004 (Amendment of Schedule 7) (City of Exeter) Regulations 2012, which came into force on 30th January 2012.

There is also this Explanatory Memorandum to Traffic Management Act 2004 (Amendment of Schedule 7) (City of Exeter) Regulations 2012 [2012 No.12].

It appears that these Regulations amend paragraph 4 of that Schedule (parking contraventions outside Greater London) by adding to the list of such contraventions the offence under section 30(1) of the Exeter City Council Act 1987 of parking vehicles, other than certain heavy commercial vehicles, on verges, central reservations and footways.

4) Freeing pedestrians from pavement parking blight
In Feb 2011, Norman Baker sent a letter to all local authorities telling them to use their powers to prevent parking on the pavement where it is a problem. [ DfT News Story: Freeing pedestrians from pavement parking blight, 21 February 2011]

norman-baker-letter-on-pavement-parking-1

norman-baker-letter-on-pavement-parking-2

What was DCC’s response to this instruction?

5) Pavement Parking (Protection of Vulnerable Pedestrians) Bill 2015-16
Recent updates  to Exeter HATOC have talked about the progress of a Bill through Parliament – this was a Private Members Bill presented by Martin Horwood who came last of 20 in the 2014 ballot. The Bill never made any Parliamentary progress, not even having the Second Reading in the House of Commons , despite appearing on the Order Paper twice.

Simon Hoare – just up the road in North Dorset – came 10th of 20 in this year’s ballot.

Is there any information that would suggest this PMB will make further progress?

One of the problems of problem I forsee if Simon Hoares’ Private Members Bill does make it onto the Statute Books is that following enactment any permitted pavement parking would need to be authorised by an expensive TRO.

In Cowick there are already exemptions for Sussex Close and Wiltshire Close, but I can see TRPs being needed for pavement parking along Barley Farm Road just so that the P bus can make its journey towards the city centre unhindered.

And what about Merrivale Road? And so on.

So the isn’t going to be the silver bullet we all hope it will be.

6) Partial pavement parking
We know around all our divisions that some roads would come to a halt if pavement parking wasn’t possible.

I can list Sussex Close and Wiltshire Close that allowed partial pavement parking under Exeter Act 1987.

But without partial pavement parking, the P bus cannot make progress down Barley Farm Road. And Merrivale Road would be almost impassable.

So we have a problem.

We have be able to allow partial pavement parking – but in a way that doesn’t make the pavement an obstacle course for people with mobility issues, have visual impairments and parents using buggies and pushchairs.

Under the Exeter Act its quite easy for HATOC to agree an exemption for those narrow closes and cul-de-sacs (for many around the city those are in place, but we can all think of others).

But to deal with the major routes, it’s probably going to be necessary for a TRO, signs and lines to be put in place to ensure pedestians can pass without obstruction.

Slough have recently put this into practice – has this done under the provisions of Traffic Signs Manual Chapter 3 (Regulatory Signs 2008) p73 which shows the painted partial parking bay (diagram 1028.4) with accompanying signs (diagrams 667.1 and 667.2) with all the costs advertising TRO etc or by some other means?

7) Damage of grass verges
Highways Act 1980 s131 makes it is an offence to damage a highway (including a footpath) without lawful authority or excuse and can be punishable by a claim for criminal damages.

And in Blackpool, CEOs are issuing PCNs for damage to grass strips.

Have DCC given any thought to this? If DC are required to carry out remedial work due to damageto grass verges or footways, can they seek to recover any expenses incurred and prosecute persistant offenders?

8) Advisory Enforcement Notices
At Full Council on 23 July Cllr Hart in a written reply to a question from Cllr Percy Prowse [Question 13] mentioned advisory enforcement notices?

What are these?

And how will these be used?

Are the police on-board with this?

Is there to be a publicity campaign?

9) How has review of Traffic Signs & Generla Directions affected progress?
I understand that the situation in Exeter has been complicated by the long-running review of the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions 2002 and subsequent amendments.

TSRGD 2002 proscibes what road signs are needed and where they should go for every traffic regulation.

Without suitble regulations in place (and DfT not making decisions in their absence) on signage for Exeter Act 1987, I’m guessing the issue is about legality and risk of prosecution, with people more likely to challenge a parking fine.

I’m assuming that at a time when council budgets are being cut, an extremely cautious approach has been adopted?

And since the draft version has been consulted on, is there an estimate when the TSRGD 2015 come into force?

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Exeter HATOC | Pavement parking

Exeter Highways and Traffic Orders Committee [HATOC] meets on 28 July 2015 and once again is set to discuss the issue of pavement parking

10. Update on Parking on Pavements

In accordance with Standing Order 23(2) Councillor Owen has requested that the Committee consider this matter

Presentation by the Head of Highways, Capital Development and Waste

Electoral Division: all in Exeter

When Devon County Council took over parking enforcement on 08 May 2008, there wasn’t time to transfer the provisions of the Exeter Act 1987 at the same time.

Since then parking on pavements has been a constant feature on Exeter HATOC’s agend

02/02/12

9. Parking on Pavements and Enforcement
In accordance with Standing Order 23(2) Councillor Owen has asked that the Committee consider this item

Report of the Head of Highways and Traffic Management ( HTM/12/4 – text only | pdf ) (Page 23) on details of the relevant Act and enforcement.

Electoral Divisions: All in Exeter

*118. Parking on Pavements and Enforcement
(In accordance with Standing Order 23(2) Councillor Owen had asked that the Committee consider this item)

The Committee noted the report of the Head of Highways and Traffic Management (HTM/12/4 – text only | pdf ) on proposals for the County Council to take over parking enforcement from the Police (decriminalisation) regarding provisions within an Exeter City Council local Act implemented in 1987 in respect of prohibition of parking on verges, central reservations and footways.

The Neighbourhood Highway Group Manager reported that the Department of Transport has now published a Statutory Instrument that amends the schedules in the Traffic Management Act 2004 to decriminalise prohibition of parking on verges, central reservations and footways in Exeter City. The County Council would now check that the signs indicating the restricted areas and publicise that the provisions would now be enforced by Civil Enforcements Officers (and not the police). Current exemptions where permitted would still be applicable.

It was MOVED by Councillor Hobden, SECONDED by Councillor Leadbetter and
RESOLVED that this development be welcomed and that the new provisions be implemented as expeditiously as possible following appropriate consultation and publicity.

19/04/12 

10.  Implementation and Enforcement of Parking on Footways and Verges
In accordance with Standing Order 23(2) Councillor Macdonald has requested that the Committee consider this item.

Electoral Division: All in Exeter

*132 Implementation and Enforcement of Parking on Footways and Verges
(In accordance with Standing Order 23(2) Councillor Macdonald has requested that the Committee consider this item).

(Councillor Bull attended in accordance with Standing Order 25(2) and spoke to this item).

The Neighbourhood Highway Group Manager reported that a review of the signage and their replacement was underway. Implementation of the new enforcement powers by the County Council (through the Civil Enforcement Officers) was planned for September 2012. Exemptions would be permitted under the regulations.

The Committee noted the position.

08/11/12

16. Various Highways Matters
In accordance with Standing Order 23(2) Councillor Bull has requested that the Committee consider the following items:
(b) Update on the pavement parking situation.

*162. Highways Matters
(In accordance with Standing Order 23(2) Councillor Bull had asked that the Committee consider the following items):
(b) Update on the pavement parking situation.

Although arising from a by-law from Exeter City Council, Devon County Council – as highways agency – are responsible for signage, etc. DfT have advised that additional signage is required (at intervals of around 400m) – how has this changed from the situation prior to 2008 change of parking enforcement operation? It is NOT a TRO matter but I’ve been advised that we should discuss a scheme for members to add additional exemptions to those that already have such exemptions (like Sussex Cl and Wiltshire Cl in Cowick).

The Head of Highways and Traffic Management reported that detailed discussion between the County Council and the Department of Transport were continuing. In the interim any suggested exemptions proposed by Members should be referred to the Exeter Neighbourhood Highway Team (Devon County Council) to assess.

22/07/14

10. Parking on Pavement
In accordance with Standing Order 23(2) Councillor Owen has requested that the Committee consider this matter.

Head of Highways, Capital Development and Waste to report.

Electoral Divisions: All in Exeter

*71 Parking on Pavements
(Councillor Bull attended in accordance with Standing Order 25(2) and spoke to this item).

In accordance with Standing Order 23(2) Councillor Owen had requested that the Committee consider what action could be taken to reduce parking on pavements.

The Head of Highways, Capital Development and Waste reported that following consultation with the Department for Transport he was developing proposals and options, in consultation with other local authorities and industry associations, to enable enforcement of parking on pavement restrictions whilst still maintaining, as appropriate, exemptions in respect of the more narrow and congested urban roads.

It was MOVED by Councillor Owen, SECONDED by Councillor Prowse and
RESOLVED that a report on proposals relating to enforcement of parking on pavements restrictions be presented to the next meeting of this Committee.

10/11/14

8. Parking on footways
Head of Highways, Capital Development and Waste to report.

Electoral Divisions: All in Exeter

*82 Parking on footways
The Head of Highways, Capital Development and Waste reported on the Pavement Parking Bill 2014-15 proceeding through Parliament to make provision for the safety, convenience and free movement on pavements of disabled people, older people, people accompanying young children, and other pavement users; to clarify, strengthen and simplify the law relating to parking on pavements in England and Wales; and for connected purposes. It was anticipated that the Bill would also cover inappropriate parking on verges. The County Council had made representation on this matter to the British Parking Association and the Parking and Traffic Regulations Outside London (PATROL) who would be consulting with other local authorities to ascertain best practice on how to deal with this matter in the interim.

Pending statutory and best practice guidance the County Council would not be proposing any policy changes but that a report would be submitted to Cabinet on future options at the appropriate time.

 

Highways in the planning process

I sit on the joint Devon County Council/Exeter City Council joint Exeter Highways and Traffic Orders Committee [HATOC] and have been contacted by a resident about planning application 15/0436/01.

In particular, the resident was concerned that the issues of vehicular access to the West of England School [WESC] via the main access off Topsham Road and from Wendover Way – along with the Hydrock Travel Plan  – hadn’t been addressed by Exeter HATOC.

The answer is somewhat technical [and maybe appear to be passing the buck] and has me going back to the terms of reference of Exeter HATOC.

Exeter HATOC is one of several [each district authority within DCC has one] and is constituted as a DCC committee which reports to the DCC Cabinet.

The current membership of exHATOC is:
all 9 DCC cllrs representing Exeter divisions, and up to 4 ECC cllrs – split 2 LAB, I CON, and 1 LD (the LD doesn’t take up seat). I am one of the labour nominated ECC cllrs.

Within the general strategy, policies and operating procedures of Devon County Council, Exeter HATOC exercises the following powers of the Highway Authority delegated by the Executive:
– To develop, approve details and monitor and implement the Statutory Devon Local Transport Plan local area improvement programmes, up to a value (work costs) of £250,000;
– To approve details and implement improvement schemes from the Statutory Devon Local Transport Plan regional, countywide and zonal and local safety scheme programmes, up to a value [works costs] of £250,000;
– To approve details and implement Traffic Regulation Orders, and schemes for the control of parking on the highway and to be involved in the development of proposals for park and ride schemes;
– To comment on proposals by third parties to stop up or divert highways and stop up private means of highway access;
– To control the use of highways by the granting of consents, approvals, licences, minor property rights in connection with operations, uses or activities on, under, over or adjacent to the highway;
– To ensure the effectiveness of the maintenance of highways, bridges and street lighting;
– To consider and approve proposals for the making up of private streets;
– To maintain an overview on issues relating to repeated obstruction of the highway and advise when action to enforce public rights of way may be considered appropriate;
– To approve the establishment or deletion of school crossing patrol sites, within the criteria and budget defined by the Council;
– To approve the revocation of New Street Orders; and
– To approve applications to the Magistrates’ Court for the stopping-up or diversion of a public highway.

What we DO NOT do is comment on planning applications! That’s why there is no record of any discussions of matters relating to Tollards Road or Southbrook Road, or access from Wendover Way, in the minutes of any of our meetings.

So how are traffic matters considered and resolved through the planning process?

Let me try and take take through the process as best I can (I’ve never sat on ECC Planning Committee).

A potential developer identifies a site – what is crucial is that – surprisingly – the developer does not need to own the land for the development. They don’t even need to have to have access rights to the land. In theory – subject to paying the appropriate fees and submitting the appropriate paperwork – anyone can submit a plan for a development on any piece of land!

So to date, Hydrock have decided to submit a planning application to ECC to develop the land to the rear of WESC.

Before they did so, they have held public consultation events (not required, but often advantageous to their cause). They have noted the public’s comments – which of course, is NOT the same has having acted on those comments.

It this pre-application stage, Hydrock are probably talking to ECC planning officers to ensure that the plans hey submit meet ECC’s planning policy guidelines.

At the same time they will probably be meeting with DDC’s highways officers who will be ensuring that highways matters met DCC’s highways design standards – and for Exeter, the officer is more than likely to be Will Pratt.

He will judge Hydrock’s proposals against design guidance issued by DC 

Probably in this specific case, the two most relevant parts will be:
Part 1 which deals with highways in residential estates; and

Part 3 which deals with the Planning Framework and covers how proposals are considered and how adoption is achieved

Within the general strategy, policies and operating procedures of Devon Council is to exercise the following powers of the Highway Authority delegated by the Executive:

  • To develop, approve details and monitor and implement the Statutory Devon Local Transport Plan local area improvement programmes, up to a value (work costs) of £250,000.
  • To approve details and implement improvement schemes from the Statutory Devon Local Transport Plan regional, countywide and zonal and local safety scheme programmes, up to a value [works costs] of £250,000.
  • To approve details and implement Traffic Regulation Orders, and schemes for the control of parking on the highway and to be involved in the development of proposals for park and ride schemes.
  • To comment on proposals by third parties to stop up or divert highways and stop up private means of highway access.
  • To control the use of highways by the granting of consents, approvals, licences, minor property rights in connection with operations, uses or activities on, under, over or adjacent to the highway.
  • To ensure the effectiveness of the maintenance of highways, bridges and street lighting.
  • To consider and approve proposals for the making up of private streets.
  • To maintain an overview on issues relating to repeated obstruction of the highway and advise when action to enforce public rights of way may be considered appropriate.
  • To approve the establishment or deletion of school crossing patrol sites, within the criteria and budget defined by the Council.
  • To approve the revocation of New Street Orders.
  • To approve applications to the Magistrates’ Court for the stopping-up or diversion of a public highway.

Within Exeter, the main design offer is Will Pratt, who will check that submitted details are in accordance with both the approved highways layout (from the planning application) and the technical specifications in relation to the construction of roads

Will and his team will provide a report to ECC planning officers as a ‘Statutory Consultee’ which will outline their thoughts about the highways aspects of the proposed development, and these will be added to the paperwork that goes before ECC planning committee – of course, if Will has done his work properly, and the developer has followed the DCC design guide! this is likely to point the committee towards approval on highways issues!

As ECC Planning Committee has a quasi-judicial function it can only refuse permission purely on planning matters (something often not appreciated by members of the public)

It is very hard for the counclllors on the Planning Committee to refuse an application on highways issues if DCC – as the Local Highways Authority –  has said that the proposals are sound in their view,as it opens up the possibility of a legal challenge from the developers. If this is the case, the developer is likely to go to appeal before the Planning Inspectorate. If the developers appeal is successful – and ECC’s decision is overturned – there would be a strong expectation that ECC would have to be all legal costs.

There is a very useful guide jointly published by the Local Government Association and the Planning Advisory Service  – How planning work: an introductory guide to councillors – but it well worth a read by members of the public

in particular, page 13 outlines what councillors can (and more importantly, cannot) base their decisions on – these are called material considerations.

The other thing to remember about the planning process is that, as a quasi-judicial process, the members of the Planning Committee are unlikely to offer a view – either way – on what they think about the application as they have to consider all the facts placed before them at the decision meeting

This can often come across as remote or stand-offish -but they have to make theior judgement on the application with an open mind, listening to ALL the evidence and not having predetermined their decision.

I hope that puts some of the myriad of issues into some kind of context

Exeter HATOC | Part-Night Street Lighting in Exeter

This afternoon’s Exeter HATOC meeting received the following report [HCW/15/3] on Part-Night Street Lighting in Exeter

1. Summary

This report updates members on progress with part-night lighting implementation within Exeter.

2. Background

In Devon, there are over 76,000 street lighting units 12,000 illuminated traffic signs, beacons and illuminated bollards. The revenue budget in 2014/15 for maintaining and operating the street lighting stock is 5.14M, of which 3.6M is for energy costs.

Street lighting accounts for 23.8% of the County Council’s carbon footprint.

A new street lighting policy was approved in July 2007 (ref: EEC/07/216/HQ) and the decision to implement part night lighting in residential areas was approved in January 2009 (ref: EEC/09/8/HQ). This street lighting policy included a number of measures to reduce the energy consumption of the street lighting stock and, as a consequence, the carbon output from street lighting.

The adopted policy for the introduction of part-night lighting in residential areas means some streetlights that were previously on all-night long will now be lit between dusk and about 12:30am and will then be switched off until about 5:30am, they will then be lit from about 5:30am until dawn. The policy allows for some lights in residential areas to remain lit all night, for example on main routes through communities, at busy junctions, in areas of high night time activity, in areas of CCTV surveillance and where there is evidence of a need, which is supported by objective data.

A proposal to implement a remote monitoring system was approved in April 2012 (ref: CDW/12/11). Remote monitoring for street lighting offers an alternative to the conventional arrangements for management of the lighting stock and implementation of part night lighting and night dimming. The systems provide a more flexible solution, via a web based interface, to reduce lighting intensities incrementally and implement and adjust part night lighting and night dimming schemes. This can all be done from a central location, thus removing the need for site visits to adjust and change the lighting regime at individual columns.

The solution also gives warning of faults and gives notification of lighting failures. It removes the need for night scouting, as the system detects and alerts the street lighting team to lamp failures.

It has been agreed to introduce the remote monitoring system in Exeter with a view to widening its use to other locations in the future. The system is being implemented in conjunction with the implementation of part-night lighting in the city.

3. Progress update

The implementation of part-night operation of street lights in Exeter began in September 2013 in Alphington and Cowick wards and involved the fitting of remote monitoring components into existing lanterns and replacement of existing lanterns that were not suitable. Similar work in Exwick and St Thomas wards began in October 2013.

Street lights in Alphington and Cowick started operating part-night in April 2014 and in Exwick and St Thomas in May 2014.

Conversion work began in Duryard and Pennsylvania wards in June 2014 and lights started operating part-night in November 2014.

Conversion work began in St James ward in October 2014 and in St Davids ward in November, lights in both wards will remain operational all night.

Each individual street light has a communication node fitted to it and up to 250 lighting units in an area are controlled by a Branch node located within the ward.

Communication between the nodes and branch and between the branch and central control is via air-borne radio communication and can be accessed via the internet. So it is possible to allocate switching profiles to individual and groups of lights so that they can operate all night or part-night.

In a project of this complexity it is inevitable that there have been some issues in commissioning the work. The efficient operation of this remote monitoring system relies on good radio communications and an effective geographic location of branch controllers, so that command instructions can be issued as necessary. In addition as part of the installation, when lights are first commissioned, the lights themselves will operate during the day light hours for a day or two prior to operating dusk to dawn, or part-night as required.

However, in some instances, lights have been on during the day for longer than envisaged, either as a result of poor communications, or faulty components. These issues have affected only a small percentage of lights so far converted. In the main, a re-mapping of nodes and their branch controllers have been sufficient to improve communications, but in some areas it has been necessary to install additional branch controllers.

The County Council is communicating regularly with the system supplier and the term contractor in order to learn from and minimise commissioning faults during the remainder of the project.

The table below gives details of units converted to-date in each ward with the remaining provisional implementation programme shown in descending order.

WARD PROGRESS PART-NIGHT OPERATION TOTAL NUMBER OF LIGHTS CONVERTED TOTAL NUMBER OF LIGHTS OPERATING PART-NIGHT
Alphington 99% Complete * Yes 1,214 792
Cowick 99% Complete * Yes 441 331
St Thomas 99% Complete * Yes 398 305
Exwick 99% Complete * Yes 889 190
Duryard 99% Complete * Yes 193 143
Pennsylvania 99% Complete * Yes 634 462
St James 99% Complete * No 330 0
St Davids 99% Complete * No 218 0
Priory Branch & new units Not Yet 18 0
St Leonards Branch & new units Not Yet 6 0
Newtown Branch node only No 1 0
Polsloe Branch & new units Not Yet 4 0
Pinhoe Branch & new units Not Yet 20 0
Mincinglake Branch node only Not Yet 1 0
Heavitree Branch & new units Not Yet 21 0
Whipton Barton Branch & new units Not Yet 8 0
St Loyes Branch & new units Not Yet 3 0
Topsham Branch & new units Not Yet 31 0

Although conversion works are substantially complete, there are a small number of lanterns that are of modern architectural design, or classic heritage type, that are not suitable for immediate conversion with the remote monitoring system. These lanterns may also be expensive to replace, or still have quite a long working life remaining. As technology develops and when the bulk of the works are complete in Exeter as a whole, the wards will be revisited to see if there are affordable solutions to address these remaining lanterns.

4. Consultation

Consultation events were held between September and November 2013, which included information displays and a number of ward meetings with presentations and question and answer sessions. There was a very low response rate and analysis indicated that 56 of the responses showed support for the proposal to introduce part-night operation whilst 23 responses indicated objection to the proposals.

Consultation on part-night lighting in Exeter continues on the street lighting section of the County Council web pages where feedback is being collected. This will continue until six months after the final area of Exeter is converted to part-night lighting.

In addition to a six month review of each ward after switching to part-night operation and following a 12 month cycle of part-night lighting after all works are substantially complete, together with the availability of police comments, it is intended to review common themes and propose actions to address these. There will also be the opportunity to review and take action at any time if evidence arises of issues in any areas following discussions with councillors and the police.

5. Legal Considerations

There are no specific legal considerations associated with this progress report.

Recommendation: It is recommended that the Committee notes the progress on implementing Exeter part-night lighting 

Exeter HATOC | Could the Slough model of pavement parking work in Cowick?

Yet again the issue of parking on pavements has surfaced, this time at the meeting of Exeter HATOC held on 22 July 2014.

 attended the meeting on in accordance with Standing Order 25(2) and spoke to this item:

When this debate started a few years ago when Exeter HATOC wanted the section 30 of the 1987 Exeter Act which banned pavement parking  implemented,  I knew what I wanted. 

I wanted the provisions reinstated as I knew that parking on the pavement was

–         bad for those with mobility issues

–         bad for those (like my dad) with visual impairments

–         bad for mums using buggies 

But then I look what would happen to some of the streets in in my ward of Cowick. 

–         Merrivale Road might need to become one-way? 

–         Buses would no longer be able to get down Barley Farm Road?

I’ve not experienced it but I have seen a picture taken by Cllr Heather Morris where she was stuck behind a bus for many minutes as the bus driver honked his horn to try and get some cars to move. 

So is there a middle way that helps both?

Slough have just been piloting a scheme in some areas where a white line is painted on the pavement to indicate how far cars can encroach onto the pavement

These would be positioned so as to ensure that a wheelchair or buggy could still pass safely on the footpath 

I understand that local highways authorities have the power under Traffic Regulations Act 1984 to make TROs that allow for specific parking restrictions in specific areas, to deal with the demands of local circumstances. 

There are some streets in Cowick that already allow for pavement parking – they are so narrow that there are few other options. 

Is there any scope for a further exploration of the Slough model partial pavement parking provision?

The minutes of the meeting are available here.