St Mungo’s | Stop The Scandal

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4 in 10 people sleeping rough are struggling with a mental health problem, often with no support and no way home.

Like Patrick, who was stuck sleeping rough for 18 years until he was offered mental health support and a safe place to stay which helped him to rebuild his life. But for thousands of people, the support never comes.

St Mungo’s is calling on people to sign their letter and call on Prime Minister David Cameron to Stop the Scandal of people with mental health problems left sleeping rough.

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Prime Minister David Cameron
10 Downing Street
London SW1A 2AA

Dear Prime Minister David Cameron,

Will you stop the scandal of people with mental health problems left sleeping rough?

It’s not right that anyone should be without a home, and it’s nothing short of a national scandal that people with mental health problems are stuck sleeping rough.

We urge you to stop this scandal by leading a new, ambitious national rough sleeping strategy to deliver:

  • mental health assessments and professional support to people on the street,
  • specialist supported housing to aid recovery
  • the right support upon discharge so people don’t end up sleeping rough after leaving mental health hospitals, and
  • improvements to homelessness legislation to prevent more rough sleeping.

Government statistics continue to show an alarming rise in rough sleeping in England, and new research from homelessness charity St Mungo’s reveals that 4 in 10 people who sleep rough have a mental health problem, rising to over half of rough sleepers from the UK.

The research also exposes how quickly someone’s mental health can deteriorate when they are sleeping on the street. What’s more, people with a mental health problem are around 50 per cent more likely to have spent over a year on the streets than others sleeping rough.

We believe this requires urgent attention from across government and the NHS. With the right support and routes off the street, people can look after their mental health and rebuild their lives.

Government statistics continue to show an alarming rise in rough sleeping in England, and new research from homelessness charity St Mungo’s reveals that 4 in 10 people who sleep rough have a mental health problem, rising to over half of rough sleepers from the UK.

The research also exposes how quickly someone’s mental health can deteriorate when they are sleeping on the street. What’s more, people with a mental health problem are around 50 per cent more likely to have spent over a year on the streets than others sleeping rough.

We believe this requires urgent attention from across government and the NHS. With the right support and routes off the street, people can look after their mental health and rebuild their lives.

Paul Bull

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One thought on “St Mungo’s | Stop The Scandal

  1. St Mungo’s
    10 October 2016

    Rise in Homelessness highlights importance of National Rough Sleeping Strategy

    St Mungo’s delivers letter with over 15,000 signatures to 10 Downing Street calling on the Prime Minister to lead a new strategy to end rough sleeping

    Today (10 October, 11am) St Mungo’s clients, staff and volunteers are handing in a letter with over 15,000 signatures to 10 Downing Street, calling on the PM to lead an ambitious rough sleeping strategy.

    This letter, delivered on World Homelessness Day and World Mental Health Day (10 October), highlights the need to stop the scandal of people sleeping rough. St Mungo’s research found four in ten rough sleepers have a mental health problem and poor mental health is keeping people stuck on the streets for longer.
    Five years ago, government statistics showed that 1,768 people were sleeping rough in England on any one night. That figure has now more than doubled to 3,569. Recent statistics released by DCLG reveal statutory homelessness is also on the rise, up 10% in Q2 2016 compared to the same period last year.

    As part of the creation of a new national rough sleeping strategy St Mungo’s is asking the Prime Minister to deliver:

    -Mental health assessments and professional support to people on the street

    -Specialist supported housing to aid recovery

    -The right support upon discharge so people don’t end up sleeping rough after leaving mental health hospitals, and

    – Improvements to homelessness legislation to prevent more rough sleeping.

    The hand in follows a successful world record attempt, in which St Mungo’s and corporate sponsor Hitachi Consulting brought together over 200 people to break the Guinness World Record for the largest gathering of people in sleeping bags. The event, which took place in King Edward Memorial Park, London, on Friday 7 October, aimed to raise awareness of the Stop the Scandal campaign and encourage people to sign the letter to the Prime Minister.

    Howard Sinclair, Chief Executive of St Mungo’s, said: “Rough sleeping is dangerous and ruins lives. People with mental health problems are particularly at risk amongst this group of very vulnerable people.

    “The rise in all forms of homelessness further reinforces the urgency with which the issue of homelessness has to be dealt with. Our research indicates that four in ten people sleeping rough have mental health issues. By any measure these figures are unacceptable. Today we strongly urge the Prime Minister to take action and lead a new, ambitious strategy to end rough sleeping.”

    John O’Brien, EVP EMEA, Hitachi Consulting explained: “Hitachi Consulting have been proud sponsors of St Mungo’s over the last year, our core values around ethics and social responsibility strongly align with the organisation. It’s fantastic that we can support this event and help make a difference with a local, London-based charity, who are leading the way in creating awareness around homelessness in the UK.”

    ENDS

    Like

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